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How we work

When Stockholm Royal Seaport was designated by Stockholm City Council as a sustainability profile area, it was decided that the City Development Administration would lead and manage the project. Structures were established to enable administration- and company-wide working groups, including municipal experts, to collaborate.

The task of the working groups is to review sustainability targets, which are then set as requirements for developers in the same way as they are for the City of Stockholm’s own projects. The City of Stockholm owns the land and the requirements are included in land allocation- and development contracts. These requirements are reviewed and verified at all phases of a project – from preliminary concepts all the way through to property management.

Developers submit results in an online database which are reviewed by City of Stockholm experts. If requirements fail to be met, a request for deviation from the requirements may be submitted. If such a request is rejected, the requirement in question is registered as not having been met. Working groups continuously evaluate work and results. This, in combination with external monitoring, results in constant improvement to the requirements. Working group participants are also required to share experiences within their administrations and companies and with other City of Stockholm projects. Continuous capacity development is crucial to meet the project’s high ambition levels.

Since 2014, progress has been reported in a sustainability report with a supplementary in-depth appendix. Because the decision to make Stockholm Royal Seaport a sustainability profile area came 10 years after planning work had started, the first two phases – Norra 1 and Västra – are covered only by voluntary commitments. From the third phase, Norra 2, onwards, exacting sustainability requirements were introduced for all projects.

The sustainability report follows Core-level GRI guidelines.

Stockholm Royal Seaport's collaborative model.

About Stockholm Royal Seaport and Agenda 2030

In 2015, UN member states adopted Agenda 2030, an ambitious and comprehensive development agenda incorporating the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), or Global Goals. The SDGs are integrated and indivisible and several of the goals are dependent upon and closely linked to each other, which means that success in one goal has positive effects on other goals. The 2030 Agenda is global, but it is at the local level that large parts of the commitments and work on the goals are put into practice, and it is appropriate that Stockholm should be a leader in their implementation.

Agenda 2030 focuses on how cities create good access and participation for all citizens, a favourable climate for businesses and innovation, and attractive housing environments. At the same time, cities are required to reduce their environmental and climate impact, break unsustainable consumption and production patterns, fight segregation and inequality, and increase equality. Work on Agenda 2030 also stimulates collaboration, bridges stepping stones and organisational boundaries and is characterised by learning and the exchange of experience.

The development of Stockholm Royal Seaport is primarily based on SDG 11, Sustainable Cities and Communities, but it works actively with all SDGs.

Project working environment

Stockholm Royal Seaport strives proactively to ensure a safe working environment. The project initiates and runs a number of preventative programmes to create safe and secure construction sites. To include the views of all those who live in and around the construction area, risk mapping, logistics and operational information, as well as fire drills and safety walks focusing on pedestrians and cyclists are carried out.

Personal development interviews and employee surveys are conducted annually. High workloads are the biggest challenge within the organisation and an action plan has been developed to address this issue.

How we work

When Stockholm Royal Seaport was designated by Stockholm City Council as a sustainability profile area, it was decided that the City Development Administration would lead and manage the project. Structures were established to enable administration- and company-wide working groups, including municipal experts, to collaborate.

The task of the working groups is to review sustainability targets, which are then set as requirements for developers in the same way as they are for the City of Stockholm’s own projects. The City of Stockholm owns the land and the requirements are included in land allocation- and development contracts. These requirements are reviewed and verified at all phases of a project – from preliminary concepts all the way through to property management.

Developers submit results in an online database which are reviewed by City of Stockholm experts. If requirements fail to be met, a request for deviation from the requirements may be submitted. If such a request is rejected, the requirement in question is registered as not having been met. Working groups continuously evaluate work and results. This, in combination with external monitoring, results in constant improvement to the requirements. Working group participants are also required to share experiences within their administrations and companies and with other City of Stockholm projects. Continuous capacity development is crucial to meet the project’s high ambition levels.

Since 2014, progress has been reported in a sustainability report with a supplementary in-depth appendix. Because the decision to make Stockholm Royal Seaport a sustainability profile area came 10 years after planning work had started, the first two phases – Norra 1 and Västra – are covered only by voluntary commitments. From the third phase, Norra 2, onwards, exacting sustainability requirements were introduced for all projects.

The sustainability report follows Core-level GRI guidelines.

Norra Djurgårdsstadens samverkansmodell

About Stockholm Royal Seaport and Agenda 2030

In 2015, UN member states adopted Agenda 2030, an ambitious and comprehensive development agenda incorporating the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), or Global Goals. The SDGs are integrated and indivisible and several of the goals are dependent upon and closely linked to each other, which means that success in one goal has positive effects on other goals. The 2030 Agenda is global, but it is at the local level that large parts of the commitments and work on the goals are put into practice, and it is appropriate that Stockholm should be a leader in their implementation.

Agenda 2030 focuses on how cities create good access and participation for all citizens, a favourable climate for businesses and innovation, and attractive housing environments. At the same time, cities are required to reduce their environmental and climate impact, break unsustainable consumption and production patterns, fight segregation and inequality, and increase equality. Work on Agenda 2030 also stimulates collaboration, bridges stepping stones and organisational boundaries and is characterised by learning and the exchange of experience.

The development of Stockholm Royal Seaport is primarily based on SDG 11, Sustainable Cities and Communities, but it works actively with all SDGs.

Project working environment

Stockholm Royal Seaport strives proactively to ensure a safe working environment. The project initiates and runs a number of preventative programmes to create safe and secure construction sites. To include the views of all those who live in and around the construction area, risk mapping, logistics and operational information, as well as fire drills and safety walks focusing on pedestrians and cyclists are carried out.

Personal development interviews and employee surveys are conducted annually. High workloads are the biggest challenge within the organisation and an action plan has been developed to address this issue.